Perspectives

Percutaneous mitral valve interventions

Perspectives

Percutaneous mitral valve interventions

STEPHEN TOMLINSON, Gregory M. Scalia

Figures

© katleho seisa/istockphoto.com model used for illustrative purposes only
© katleho seisa/istockphoto.com model used for illustrative purposes only

Abstract

In patients who are high risk for open cardiac surgery, percutaneous mitral valve repair is now available as an effective treatment for severe mitral regurgitation. These minimally invasive procedures are performed by specialist teams in tertiary cardiac hospitals and improve quality of life and prognosis in appropriately selected patients.

Key Points

  • Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common form of valvular disease that affects blood flow to the body.
  • MR can be acute (requiring inpatient care) or chronic (can be managed in the outpatient setting) and ranges from mild to severe. Although patients with mild MR can be managed through active surveillance, those with severe MR may need further intervention.
  • Transcutaneous mitral valve repair improves symptoms and the prognosis in selected patients with severe MR.
  • The procedure is performed via keyhole access through the femoral vein and is technically successful in around 95% of patients with a major complication rate of around 3%.
  • Patients are typically discharged from hospital 24 to 48 hours after the procedure and may return to unrestricted activities after two weeks.
  • Patients require yearly surveillance echocardiography with mitral valve assessment after the procedure.